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PointsBet, National Council on Problem Gambling Announce Joint Initiative

PointsBet, an Australian-based sportsbook, and the National Council on Problem Gambling announced this week a joint research initiative that will focus on responsible gambling choices for online betting companies.

This research initiative is aimed at studying how people in the gambling, healthcare, and government industries will respond to problem gambling scenarios.

“With the rapid expansion of legalized sports betting across the U.S., a commitment to responsible gambling today will have a direct impact on the future health of players and sustainability of the industry,” PointsBet USA CEO Johnny Aitken said in a news release. “Navigating how to identify and address problem gambling is a complex and sensitive issue, and operators are regularly faced with how to best respond to customers who are exhibiting problematic gambling behavior. Through this research project, we’re aiming to gain more insights on the thought process that goes into finding solutions for those impacted by problem gambling as well as better help inform operator decision making on this matter.”

Stakeholders will be analyzed on their responses by PointsBet, the NCPG, and the Massachusetts Council on Gaming and Health. The only stakeholders who were eligible to participate in this research study were the ones who attended the National Conference on Gambling Addiction & Responsible Gambling 2022.

More on the National Conference on Gambling Addiction & Responsible Gambling

The theme for the 36th annual conference was “Better Together: Advocacy, Awareness & Assistance.” All three words embody action against problem gambling in the growing gaming industry.

A digital symposium in June kicked off the event, then attendees met this week for a series of workshops and the main conference. Industry experts shared their own experiences, research, discoveries, and solutions for gambling addiction.

If you or someone you know are experiencing problem gambling issues, call or text the National Helpline at 1-800-522-4700 for assistance.

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