On This Date in Sports Betting History: April 4

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There are no sports being played on April 4, 2020. There were, however, sports being played on this date last year.

And in 2018. And in 2017. And … you get it.

With nothing to bet on during this pandemic period, let’s to take a trip down memory lane and relive the best sports betting moments on this date in history.

April 4, 2016: Villanova vs. North Carolina, National Championship

  • Spread: North Carolina -2
  • Over/under: 149.5

In one of the most exciting finishes in NCAA Tournament history, Villanova’s Kris Jenkins hits a game-winning 3 at the buzzer to break a 74-74 tie — one that came to be only as a result of an even more ridiculous shot by UNC’s Marcus Paige with four seconds remaining.

With the outright win, Villanova obviously covers its +2 spread, and the shot sends the total over the closing number of 149.5, though over bettors truly lost their bet on Paige’s equalizer.

April 4, 1988: Kansas vs. Oklahoma, National Championship

  • Spread: Oklahoma -8

Reaching the national title game as a 6-seed, Kansas is given eight points in the betting market against conference rival and No. 1 Oklahoma.

📅 April 4, 1988: Five years after NC State & 32 years ago today…

National Title 🏆
#6 Kansas vs. #1 Oklahoma (-8)

🗣️ "The Kansas Jayhawks have beaten all odds…"

The 3rd biggest title game upset since seeding began in 1979 ✅: pic.twitter.com/fjZs9hQ65d

— The Action Network (@ActionNetworkHQ) April 4, 2020

Tied at 50 at the half, the game slowed down in the second, with Kansas outscoring the Sooners 33-29 to earn the upset. It’s the third-largest upset by point spread in a championship game since 1979 (Villanova over Georgetown and UConn over Duke).

April 4, 1983: NC State vs. Houston, National Championship

  • Spread: Houston -7

Five years prior, Jim Valvano’s NC State Wolfpack pull off a similarly impressive upset, beating Houston, 54-52, on a buzzer-beating dunk by Lorenzo Charles as a 7-point underdog.

The dunk and (moreso) Valvano’s reaction have become among the most iconic moments in NCAA Tournament history.

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