Loyola Chicago vs. Georgia Tech Betting Odds: Spread, Prediction For 2021 NCAA Tournament

Loyola Chicago vs. Georgia Tech Betting Odds: Spread, Prediction For 2021 NCAA Tournament article feature image
Credit:

Ronald Martinez/Getty Images. Pictured: Cameron Krutwig.

  • Loyola Chicago is a short favorite over Georgia Tech in the first round of the 2021 NCAA Tournament.
  • The Yellow Jackets won the ACC Tournament in just two games thanks to COVID cancelations, but looked excellent in the final against Florida State.
  • But Loyola has been playing like a top-10 team all season, and Andrew Norton thinks the Ramblers will advance.

#8 Loyola Chicago vs. #9 Georgia Tech Odds

GA Tech Odds +2.5
Loyola (IL) Odds -2.5
Moneyline +125 / -150
Over/Under 126.5
Time Friday, 4 p.m. ET
TV TNT
Odds as of Sunday and via BetMGM

How Loyola Chicago & Georgia Tech Match Up

Loyola Chicago
vs.
Georgia Tech
342
Tempo
215
9
eFG%
42
154
TO%
29
230
OR%
252
193
FTR
239
37
DeFG%
263
48
DTO%
15
3
DR%
251
8
DFTR
110
All stats via KenPom.

Loyola Chicago vs. Georgia Tech Instant Analysis

Loyola Chicago got absolutely betrayed by the committee this year. KenPom has it ranked as the ninth-best team in adjusted efficiency margin. Effectively, he believes the Ramblers are the ninth-best team in the nation, and they got an eight-seed.

In addition, if they squeak by a surprising Georgia Tech squad, they immediately have to deal with Illinois, a team I believe will find itself in the Final Four.

This certainly draws some concerns about the committee, in my opinion. It clearly still doesn’t value teams that dominate in their respective conferences, despite accurate adjusted statistical analysis.

Georgia Tech is an unfortunate draw for Loyola Chicago, but the Ramblers are arguably a top-10 team in the nation, and I expect them to handle business behind their star, Jokic-like center, Cameron Krutwig. Expect their No. 1 defense in the nation to give the Yellow Jackets some trouble in a low-scoring affair. — Andrew Norton

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What To Know About Loyola Chicago

Loyola’s defensive success is predicated on its “No Middle” philosophy and its tireless on-ball pressure in the half-court. The results are staggering, and it starts with Lucas Williamson. The MVC Defensive Player of the Year is one of the best lockdown defenders you’ll ever see, and he excels at taking away an opponent’s top scoring option.

Collectively, Loyola’s defense is elite in nearly every metric. The Ramblers don’t give up easy looks, rebound the ball at a high level and do it all without fouling, so it’s no surprise they rank No. 3 in Adjusted Deficiency, per KenPom. They play at a very slow place and don’t give an inch on the defensive end of the floor. A transition-reliant team does not want to run into Loyola.

The offense runs through crafty big man Cam Krutwig in the post and is not easy to prepare for. This is a bona-fide top-20 (potentially top-10) team in the nation (with final 4 experience and an excellent coach). No team will want to face the Ramblers, especially since they could get severely underseeded as a 7 or 8.

I would not want to be the No. 1 or 2 seed that potentially has to face them in the first or second round. — Mike Calabrese

What To Know About Georgia Tech

Led by senior Jose Alvarado at the point and ACC Player of the Year Moses Wright inside, the Yellow Jackets are an experienced team with high upside.

After losing five of seven earlier in conference play, Georgia Tech is now one of the hottest teams in the country.

The Jackets are barely inside the top-40 of KenPom’s rankings, but that understates their current play. Tthey had two horrible home losses to start the season, and those came after Georgia Tech was practicing without contact in the preseason.

Depth isn’t a strength for the Yellow Jackets, so that could come into play in the second game of the weekend, but their experience and newfound defensive prowess down the stretch will make them a tough out for anyone, especially since they utilize so many different zone looks that teams aren’t used to seeing.

They don’t turn it over but excel at forcing turnovers on the other end, which could be a major issue for some teams in the field. — Matt Trebby

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