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How Does the Cut Work at The Masters?

How Does the Cut Work at The Masters? article feature image
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Keyur Khamar/PGA TOUR via Getty Images. Pictured: Tiger Woods.

The Masters is not a full-field golf event, as it only has 90-100 players in a given year. It’s the smallest major on the golf calendar.

Therefore, the cut has always been a little unique. But in 2020, they did away with the most unique portion — that golfers not in the top 50 but within 10 strokes of the lead would make the cut.

  • 1962-2012 cut format: Top 44 players and anyone within 10 strokes of the lead
  • 2013-2019 format: Top 50 and ties, or within 10 strokes of the lead.
  • 2020-2022 cut format: Top 50 and ties

That means any player who finishes the first two rounds in 50th or better will advance to the weekend.

As of Friday at 1 p.m. ET, DataGolf projects the most-likely cuts at +4 or +5 for the 2022 Masters, with +3 at just a 3% chance.

Often, the players tied for the final spot will not be in 50th exactly. There will be many players tied for 46th, for example, who stretch behind the 50th spot. They would all make the cut, and the players who are tied for 55th would not.

Normally, anywhere from 55% to 70% of the Masters field makes the cut, but over the last 20 years, it’s been under 50% on three occasions.

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Past Masters Cuts

Year Cut Line Made Cut %
2000 +4 60.00%
2001 +1 50.54%
2002 +3 50.56%
2003 +5 52.69%
2004 +4 47.31%
2005 +4 53.76%
2006 +4 52.22%
2007 +8 61.86%
2008 +3 47.87%
2009 +1 52.08%
2010 +3 50.00%
2011 +1 49.49%
2012 +5 66.32%
2013 +4 64.89%
2014 +4 52.58%
2015 +2 56.70%
2016 +6 64.05%
2017 +6 56.99%
2018 +5 60.92%
2019 +3 74.71%
2020 +1 65.22%
2021 +3 61.36%
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